Home > Uncategorized > The very global supply and demand chain of tuberculosis vaccin

The very global supply and demand chain of tuberculosis vaccin

I’m working a bit on (multi-factor) productivity at the moment. Part of this endeavour is taking a hard look at the details which, in my case, means taking a hard look at the productivity of cows (over the long haul). How did farmers, studbooks, veterinarians, (cooperative) factories and the government together manage to increase the productivity of cows? This is not just about the fat content of milk and yields per cow but also about quality improvement, which I operationalize as the eradication of bovine tuberculosis and therewith a better quality of (tbc free) milk. Should such a quality improvement be incorporated into our metric of productivity? Anyway, I found the next interesting quotes about tbc vaccine on Wikipedia:

The BCG vaccine was first used medically in 1921. It is on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system Between 2011 and 2014 the wholesale price was $0.16 to $1.11 USD a dose in the developing world In the United States it costs $100 to $200 USD As of 2004 the vaccine is given to about 100 million children per year globally ..

Global demand increases, but there are problems with production:

In the fall of 2011 the Sanofi Pasteur plant flooded causing problems with mold. The facility, located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, produced BCG vaccine products, made with substrain Connaught, such as a tuberculosis vaccine ImmuCYST, a BCG Immunotherapeutic -a bladder cancer drug. By April 2012 the FDA had found dozens of documented problems with sterility at the plant including mold, nesting birds and rusted electrical conduits The resulting closure of the plant for over two years resulting in shortages of bladder cancer and tuberculosis vaccines. On October 29, 2014 Health Canada gave the permission for Sanofi to resume production of BCG.

  1. February 15, 2017 at 1:34 am

    Funny you should mention this right now, given the latest nutritionfact.org biweekly video:

    http://nutritionfacts.org/video/does-paratuberculosis-in-meat-trigger-type-1-diabetes/

    I don’t think we know for sure, but bovine paratuberculosis through either meat or milk is one of the likely causes of type 1 diabetes in first world countries.

  2. merijntknibbe
    February 15, 2017 at 7:56 am

    Thank you, I can in fact directly use this in my work. The point: Friesian {farmers+veterinarians=docters+government+dairy industry} had managed to eradicate bovine tuberculosis in 1951, which might have been a world first (not sure about that, yet). The rest of the Netherlands copied the trick and, this time guided by the government, followed suit. Around 1960, Bovine tuberculosis was all but exterminated in the Netherlands (that fast!). That’s 56 years ago. But your linbk states: “I started speaking out about the link between paratuberculosis infection in milk and meat and human disease 15 years ago. Even cynical me is shocked that the industry hasn’t done more to clean up their act”.

    WE KNOW HOW TO DO IT. IT’S NOT ROCKET SCIENCE. WE CAN DO IT – FAST. BUT IS DOES REQUIRE CONCERTED ACTION NOT PROVIDED BY THE ‘NARROW’ MARKET OF ‘PRICES ONLY’. IT REQUIRES A VISIBLE HAND.

    I have to state that tough çivil society’ hugely contributed to the extermination in Friesland, export requirements (tuberculosis free animals, there was large international demand for Frisian studbook cattle) provided quite some intencive, to an extent this is of course the ‘narrow market’ but these requirements are typically set by governments.

    The less relevant question: what does this mean for our concepts of ‘productivity’? There seems to be a free glass of germ free milk.

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