Home > Uncategorized > Syll’s top 20 books compared to RWER’s top 10 and its poll’s top 40 vote receivers

Syll’s top 20 books compared to RWER’s top 10 and its poll’s top 40 vote receivers

In May of 2016 the Real-World Economics Review conducted a poll titled “Top 10 Economics Books of the Last 100 Years”  Voting was open to the journal’s 26,000 subscribers, and over 3,000 of them voted, each having up to ten votes and with 17,270 votes in total cast. The results were published two weeks later and linked on over 2,000 Facebook pages.  It is interesting to compare those results to Lars Syll’s personal list of “Top 20 heterodox economics books” published here earlier today.

Although the RWER subscribers list was not limited to “heterodox” economics books, eight of Syll’s top 20 appear in the RWER subscribers’ Top Ten.

Pasted below are the 40 books in the RWER poll that received the most votes.  Notably, Syll’s list contains only one book published in this millennium and the RWER’s top 20 only three.

The 40 books that received the most votes in the RWER poll for the
Top 10 Economics Books of the Last 100 Years 

  1. John Maynard Keynes, General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money (1936)   1,597
  2. Karl Polanyi, The great transformation (1944)            1,027
  3. Joseph A. Schumpeter, Capitalism, Socialism & Democracy (1942)       927
  4. John Kenneth Galbraith, The Affluent Society (1958)  780
  5. Hyman Minsky, Stabilizing an Unstable Economy (1986)         731
  6. Thomas Piketty, Capital in the Twenty-First Century (2014)       687
  7. Joan Robinson, The Accumulation of Capital (1956)       583
  8. Michal Kalecki, Selected Essays on the Dynamics of the Capitalist Economy (1971)    582
  9. Amartya Sen, Collective Choice and Social Welfare (1970)     580
  10. Piero Sraffa, Production of Commodities by Means of Commodities (1960)       500

  1. Joseph E. Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents, 2001      484
  2. Paul Sweezy and Paul A. Baran, Monopoly Capitalism (1966)        455
  3. Elinor Ostrom, Governing the Commons (1990)        439
  4. Ronald Coase, The Nature of the Firm (1937)      418
  5. Immanuel Wallerstein, The Capitalist World-Economy (1979)        408
  6. Wassily Leontief, Input Output Economics (1986)             405
  7. Steve Keen, Debunking Economics (2001)       403
  8. Friedrich Hayek, Individualism and Economic Order (1948)        392
  9. Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen, The Entropy Law and the Economic Process (1971)    381
  10. Kenneth Arrow, Social Choice and Individual Values (1951)        377
  1. David Graeber, Debt: The First 5000 Years (2011)             372
  2. Charles P. Kindleberger, Manias, Panics and Crashes (2005)          370
  3. Daniel Kahneman, Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011) 353
  4. Ernst F. Schumacher, Small Is Beautiful (1973)          333
  5. Herman E. Daly, Steady State Economics (1977)          245
  6. Irving Fisher, The Money Illusion (1928)           245
  7. Donella H. Meadows, The Limits to Growth (1972)      245
  8. Arthur Lewis, The Theory of Economic Growth (1955)        223
  9. Michael Hudson, The Bubble and Beyond (2012)             216
  10. Luigi Pasinetti, Structural Change and Economic Growth (1981)         204
  1. Michel Aglietta, A Theory of Capitalist Regulation (1979)       199
  2. Kenneth E. Boulding, Evolutionary Economics (1981)       182
  3. Erik S. Reinert, How Rich Countries Got Rich and Why Poor Countries Stay Poor (2007)
  4. Geoffrey M. Hodgson, How Economics Forgot History (2001)       179
  5. Tony Lawson, Economics and Reality (1997)         160
  6. Mandelbrot, Benoît B. The (Mis)Behavior of Markets (2004)       153
  7. Paul Davidson, Money and the Real World (1972)       151
  8. Nicholas Stern, The Economics of Climate Change (2007)        140
  9. Deirdre McCloskey, Measurement and Meaning in Economics (1999)        138
  10. Philip Mirowski, Machine Dreams: Economics Becomes a Cyborg Science (2002)   108
  1. March 18, 2018 at 6:57 pm

    Hmm … but #14 is not a book, and if we are to include articles the list seems to have many other omissions, no? e.g. Friedman.

  2. March 19, 2018 at 7:43 pm

    Here’s a link to “The Art of the Lie,” 32 pp from Common Cause and Fred Wertheimer.  Trump’s Attacks on the Judiciary are denounced on p.5. https://artofthelie.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/7/2018/01/ArtoftheLie_Web.pdf Salud! Marc

  3. Paul Davidson
    March 19, 2018 at 7:45 pm

    Wait until you read my newest (just published) book entitled WHO’S AFRAID OF JOHN MAYNAR KEYNES?

  4. April 1, 2018 at 11:00 pm

    Ok, so some people voted for Hayek. Does “Top 40” imply “good” or “applicable to the real world”?

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